HTML5 Web Messaging

Mobile WebWearable Web

Dependencies

  • Tizen 2.4 and Higher for Mobile
  • Tizen 2.3.1 and Higher for Wearable
  • Tizen 3.0 and Higher for TV

Content

Related Info

Web messaging is used to deliver messages between documents. Web messaging allows cross-origin resource sharing (CORS).

The main features of the HTML5 Web Messaging API include:

With the Web Messaging API, messages are sent and received asynchronously using the MessageEvent object (in mobile, wearable, and TV applications), within 1 domain or between different domains.

Using Cross-document Messaging

Send the message from the sending page using the postMessage() method of the receiving page window object (in mobile, wearable, and TV applications). To receive the page, the receiving page window object must be registered to receive messages.

The postMessage() method supports the following parameters:

  • message: Message to be sent.
  • targetOrigin: Domain receiving the message. If a certain domain cannot be defined, use the wildcard ('*').
  • transfer (optional): List of transferable objects.

Learning how to use cross-document messaging enhances the communication capabilities of your application:

  1. Create document A and B.
  2. Insert document B as iframe into document A:
    <iframe id="frame1" src="./web_messaging_cross_document_messaging_iframe.htm"></iframe>
    
  3. In document A, use the sendMessage() method to send a message to document B.

    Use the postMessage() method of the iframe window, which sends the message from the method content, to deliver the message to the iframe.

    <script>
        function sendMessage(message) {
            var frame1 = document.getElementById('frame1');
            frame1.contentWindow.postMessage(message, '*');
        }
    </script>
    
  4. Register the message event handler in document B to receive the sent message:
    <script>
        btnSendMessageHandler = function(e) {
            var messageEle = document.getElementById('message');
            sendMessage(messageEle.value);
        };
        /* Register event handler */
        btnSendMessage.onclick = btnSendMessageHandler;
    </script>
    

Source Code

For the complete source code related to this use case, see the following file:

Using Channel Messaging

The MessageChannel instance broadcasts message sending and receiving, and has 2 properties: port1 and port2. Each port is used to send and receive messages, and a message that is sent from one port with the postMessage() method is received by the other through the message event.

Learning how to use channel messaging enhances the communication capabilities of your application:

  1. To send a message from document A to document B, create in document A a MessageChannel interface instance (in mobile, wearable, and TV applications), which has 2 message port attributes (in mobile, wearable, TV applications): port1 and port2.

    The port2 attribute of the MessageChannel instance is delivered to document B through the postMessage() method of the document B window object:

    <script>
        var messageChannel = new MessageChannel();
    
        function setMessagePort() {
            /* iframe element ID of the port to be delivered */
            var frame1 = document.getElementById('iframe1');
            frame1.contentWindow.postMessage('', [messageChannel.port2], '*');
        }
    
        window.onload = function() {
            setMessagePort();
        };
    
        /* Message is sent to port2 through port1 */
        function sendMessage(message) {
            messageChannel.port1.postMessage(message);
        }
    </script>
    
    Note The postMessage() method can have 3 parameters: message, origin (in mobile, wearable, and TV applications), and ports.

    According to the W3C specifications, the arguments are ordered as message, origin, and ports. However, in Tizen, the order used is actually message, ports, and origin. This approach is used in all browsers that currently support the MessageChannel interface.

  2. Define a message event in the window object of document B, and register the event handler in the port sent from document A.
    <script>
        var port = null;
    
        messageHandler = function(e) {
            port = e.ports[0];
            port.onmessage = function(e) {
                var messageEle = document.getElementById('message');
                messageEle.innerHTML = e.data;
            };
        };
    
        window.onmessage = messageHandler;
    </script>
    

    A message sent through the postMessage() method of port1 from document A is received through the message event of port2 in document B, and the message sent through the postMessage() method of port2 from document B is received through the message event of port1 in document A.

Source Code

For the complete source code related to this use case, see the following files: